Saturday, March 1, 2014

The Five Places Not To Miss In Seville.


The Andalusian city of Seville, located in the south of Spain, is known for its history. There is an ancient minaret that was transformed into a bell tower, a Jewish Quarter and a gypsy neighbourhood filled with flamenco and tapas bars.

The Giralda and the Cathedral of Seville.
The Cathedral of Seville is one of the city's most famous landmarks, and is the place where Christopher Columbus is supposedly buried. The cathedral was built on the ruins of an ancient mosque that was built when the Moors ruled this city, and some elements of the mudejar architecture can be seen in the cathedral. The Giralda tower is the main symbol of this southern city. This ancient minaret tower is now the bell tower of the cathedral. The cathedral has several naves with vaulted ceilings, and its main attraction is the Retablo Mayor, a large gilded altarpiece decorated with carvings. The cathedral has several chapels and sacristies, and many of the sacristies are now galleries filled with religious relics. Visitors can climb up to the top of the bell tower, from where they can enjoy views towards the city center and the Guadalquivir river. After viewing the city from above visitors can walk around the cathedral's gardens, a large patio with orange trees and stone benches.

The Royal Alcazar.
The Alcazar used to be an ancient Moorish fortress. The fortress was later transformed into a royal palace. This palace is located in the city center, steps away from the cathedral. The palace is filled with gardens, baths and pools.

Barrio de Santa Cruz.
Barrio de Santa Cruz is the city's historical center, where Seville's main landmarks, including the Alcazar and the cathedral, are located. This area is known for its cobblestone streets, houses with flower-filled balconies, many plazas lined with orange trees and traditional craft shops. Some of the city's most famous restaurants, several boutique hotels and tapas bars are located in this area. Many bars are decorated with heads of bulls, ceramic murals depicting the city center and stacks of wines.

Triana neighbourhood.
The ancient district of Triana is located on the other side of the Guadalquivir river, opposite the historical city center. This area can be reached by crossing the Isabel II bridge. The area used to be the most traditional gypsy neighbourhood, filled with flamenco bars. Many of the country's most famous bullfighters, flamencos dancers and flamenco singers used to live here.

María Luisa Park.
This park is located close to the city center, steps away from the banks of the river. The park grounds used to be the gardens of the San Telmo Palace. Later the gardens were transformed into a park filled with paths and a large square, the Plaza de España Square. This square was built for an expo, and many of the historical buildings around the square are now museums. The square has a semicircular shape and is decorated with ceramic tiles, many of which were made in the traditional craft shops of the Triana district. Part of the square is lined with niches, and each niche is decorated with a ceramic-tiled bench and a mural. Each niche represents a Spanish province, and the murals are decorated with the main landmarks and products that can be found in that province. Visitors will be able to explore the park on foot and during a ride in a very typical horse-drawn carriage.

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